7 Tips For Teaching Your Teen To Drive


Turning 16 is very exciting for most teens because they know they can get a driver's license. Instead of asking their parents for rides to their friends' houses and the movie theater, they can finally drive themselves. However, the idea of your teen driving on the busy roads can make you a little nervous. If you take the time to teach your teen how to drive responsibly, you will be less worried about them. Here are seven tips for teaching your teen to drive:

Get a Safe Car

Before your let your teen drive on the road, get the safest car you can afford. If the car your teen drives has safety features, such as anti-lock breaks and head restraints, they will be safer during a crash. In addition, buying a safer car can also reduce your auto insurance premiums.

Start Slow

When your teen is first learning how to navigate a car, it is not a good idea to have them drive on the express way. They will likely get overwhelmed and have a bad experience. Instead, have your teen drive around in an empty parking lot until they become comfortable behind the wheel. Then, let your kid drive in a residential area with few cars. Once you think they are confident enough behind the wheel, move on to busier streets.

Provide Clear Instructions

Teaching your teen to drive can be nerve-wracking for both of you, so it is vital to provide the clearest instructions possible. For example, if your teen is driving too fast, it is not helpful to just tell them to be careful. You have to provide useful information that will improve their driving skills. Calmly tell your teen that he isn't following the speed limit and needs to slow down.

Set a Good Example

If you want your teen to be a responsible driver, you must be a good role model. According to Liberty Mutual, it is important to pay attention to your own driving behaviors as you teach your child how to drive. Don't do anything you wouldn't want your teen doing such as speeding, talking on your cell phone while driving or not wearing a seat belt. If your teen sees you disobeying the rules of the road, they won't think they has to follow them.

Don't Insult Your Teen's Driving Skills

Even if you are frustrated, you should avoid saying overly negative things about your teen's driving skills. Doing so can discourage them and even make them drive worse. Instead, calmly tell them how they could improve. For example, if your teen doesn't make a full stop at a stop sign, tell the, to take their time and stop completely before driving off.

State Your Expectations

If you let your teen know about your expectations from the beginning, they will be less likely to break any rules. Write these guidelines down so your teen never forgets them. Also, make sure your teen knows there are consequences for breaking the driving rules. For instance, if your teen texts while driving, you could take away driving privileges for a week.

Consider Driver's School

If you don't think you can devote enough time to teach your teen to drive, you should think about enrolling them in driver's school. Your teen will be taught how to drive by experienced instructors and will learn all the rules of the road. Some car insurance companies even charge cheaper premiums to teens who have graduated from driver's school. You can continue reading more here about driving schools.

If you follow these helpful tips, you can teach your teen to be a safe driver.

About Me

accepting and helping children that develop differently

Every child develops physically and emotionally in their own time. Sure, there are general milestones that should be expected to reach by a certain age, but no two children will grow and develop exactly the same. I have worked with some of the sweetest, most challenging children and have learned a lot from them. They have opened my eyes to just how different they all are and taught me what I can do to make their youth more fun and less challenging. I created this blog with the intentions of helping other adults find ways to make choices for individual children rather than age groups.

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